Marshall County’s COVID-19 case count inched up to a total of 12 positive cases with three of them active as of early this week.

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Marshall County Health Department has reported two new cases of COVID-19. One case is currently listed as hospitalized and there are three active cases in the county, health officials reported Monday.

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A new case of COVID-19 was reported in Marshall County Wednesday, according to health officials.

Marshall County commissioners Monday hired accounting firm Swindoll, Janzen, Hawk & Loyd, McPherson, to assist county employees in administering a $1.9 million federal pandemic-relief grant.

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School district officials in Kansas will decide how to reopen buildings and navigate through the 2020-21 year with help from a plan approved Wednesday by the Kansas Department of Education.  

Marshall County Health Department nurse Sue Rhodes needs the public’s help.

Marshall County commissioners on Friday opted out of the governor’s mask order, instead issuing a resolution strongly encouraging the public to wear masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

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The subject of the masks we wear used to be just an abstract discussion considered by poets and philosophers. Recently, though, it has become a very concrete, current issue on the minds of many. And, as with most topics these days, it has turned into a controversial political theme.

Marshall County Health Department reported a second confirmed case of COVID-19 in the county Monday. According to the health department, the case is unrelated to the first case, which was announced last Wednesday, June 24.

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Gov. Laura Kelly, Kansas Department for Children and Families Secretary Laura Howard and Child Care Aware of Kansas have announced additional benefits within the Hero Relief Program to continue to support child care providers impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a news release Thursday.

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Early this week Marshall County remained one of just four counties without positive tests for COVID-19 in eastern Kansas. Until Wednesday. The county now has one confirmed case, according to the Marshall County Health Department.

Any county business interested in applying for federal COVID-19 relief grant funds will have until July 10 to apply through the county’s economic development organization.

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In the midst of the COVID 19 pandemic, Marshall County Partnership for Growth has received an anonymous donation of $1,000 for the start of a county grant fund.

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A Washington County woman has tested positive for COVID-19, becoming that county’s first reported case of the coronavirus, the county’s health department announced Tuesday.

Midwest Land and Home real estate and auction company has used the pandemic as an opportunity to implement strategies to continue serving its customers. The result has been innovations that the company plans to carry on indefinitely.

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Kansas continues to reopen gradually with Gov. Laura Kelly announcing Tuesday that the state will advance from a Phase 1.5 to Phase 2, which begins Friday in the state’s reopening plan.

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Nearly 100 locomotives were lined up in Marysville’s rail yard around the south and east edge of town Friday. Rail shipments have declined, requiring the Union Pacific Railroad to operate fewer trains, said company spokesperson Raquel Espinoza. As a result, the company parked locomotives in …

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The Advocate is running an occasional series about area residents whose lives have been changed by the COVID-19 pandemic’s requirements for work and school. This week Rob Shellburne and Becky Heuer, both of Marysville, talk about a most unusual spring. Both say they appreciate the family tim…

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Former Advocate columnist Oretha Ruetti did extensive research on the effect that the 1918 influenza pandemic had on Marshall County. Her columns originally were published in 1998 on Jan. 1, 8, 15, 22, Feb. 26 and March 5. The columns later were compiled into one story, “The darkest chapter …

Mother’s Day weekend is approaching and this year offers a chance to consider what moms realy need across a nation battling COVID-19. It’s clear from reports so far that the virus disproportionately hits the poor. Why? Lack of access to health care.

Marysville resident Gina Miller, who put together a team of women to help her and husband Tony complete hundreds of masks recently for New York City hospitals, is still on the job.